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20121216
20121216
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. we're not just talking about heavy machinery but how you deal with specific stress with your age, gender, a doctor, the overwhelming majority of italian workers work with 10 or fewer employees. john: number 16 employee you have to have you representatives that is entitled to paid leave? >> eight hours per month. >> if you hire one more he must be disabled? >> number 16 the next one must be disabled or you pay the fine. john: 51st, 7% of payroll must be handicapped. >> 7% must qualify as disabled. rates of disability are pretty high. john: 101 employees, more rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350,000 under seve
she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. we're not just talking about heavy machinery but how you deal with specific stress withour age, gender, a doctor, the overwhelming majority of italian workers work with 10 or fewer emplees. john: number 16 employee you have to have you representatives that is entitled to paid leave? >> eight hours per month. >> if you hire one more he must be disabled? >> number 16 the next one must be disabled or you pay the fine. john: 51st, 7% of payroll must be handicapped. >> 7% must qualify as disabled. rates of disability are pretty high. john: 101 employees, more rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350,000 under severance pay but
of putting on taxes. >>> france, italy, the united kingdom, even greece is raising its tax rates and it's not helping at all. growth rate is very low. thank you. bugging your bus with your own tax dollars. government says it's eefgs dropping for your own safety, folks, but it is just a costly invasion of your privacy? wow. these are really good. you act surprised. aah! aah! practice makes perfect. announcer: you don't have to be perfect to be a perfect parent. there are thousands of teens in foster care who don't need perfection, they need you. >>> nothing private anymore. san francisco the latest city putting eavesdropping devices on public buses. department homeland security dishing out $6 million to the city by the bay so it can listen into the passengers and more towns are planning to do the same thing. and john hates the idea. why? >> its horrifying blast to the iron curtain world of the past where brutal governments snoop on people. we're not subjects of the federal government. they work for us. the idea they become angels so they can look over us is really scary thing. >> it's th
instead of putting on taxes. >>> france, italy, the united kingdom, even greece is raising its tax rates and it's not helping at all. growth rate is very low. thank you. bugging your bus with your own tax dollars. government says it's eefgs dropping for your own safety, folks, but it is just a costly invasion of your privacy? >>> nothing private anymore. san francisco the latest city putting eavesdropping devices on public buses. department homeland security dishing out $6 million to the city by the bay so it can listen into the passengers and more towns are planning to do the same thing. and john hates the idea. why? >> its horrifying blast to the iron curtain world of the past where brutal governments snoop on people. we're not subjects of the federal government. they work for us. the idea they become angels so they can look over us is really scary thing. >> it's the worst of the past. big brother era and worst of the future with high technology. what do you think? >> please. come on. a lot of crime happens on buses. i think it's a great idea we have cameras in there. it's not like som
it was just given to the library five years ago. we're still gathering the materials. it to italy be published 2011 with the death. so why do duet? it is full of ambition not self doubt to the self knowledge how he was said different politician and his grandfather who would stand upon the table singing sweet adeline whether he was asked to or not and john f. kennedy was a different type of politician. >> host: the only other element is the zest for being at the center of national life for the intrinsic merit apart i think oliver wendell holmes said at one point* another i heard come out of the amount of kennedy with the actions had passion at the peril of being judged not to have lived. he has assessed that is palpable. now he has won the election when of the first crisis is desegregation of the university of alabama. this is from the 50 years ago to the day old mrs. march gain there 50th anniversary. if you have never been to the civil-rights museum they have these recordings but this is the president talking with of principal face of segregation at the time the safety of james meredith safet
were there. australia, russia, italy, france. england, germany. all over the world. following this story. all the major networks were there. you know, cnn was there, of course. and so this is an international event. and so the churches have a particular role when something like this happens. that is to help people make some kind of sense of it. when it first happened, everyone, including me was in a state of complete shock. i heard, i'm the same as anyone else, a sense of sickening sense of how could this possibly happen. and you try to wrap your mind around it. and comprehend that you can't, it's just impossible. even the ways that we typically try to understand events like this through psychology and they say the man was disturbed and things like that. he certainly was. but in a war, you can understand the cultural and political tensions like this, for a natural disaster this goes way beyond that. even a very sick mentally ill individual, could never just because of that, commit a crime so horrendous. so you're thrown back, on religious concepts, that's the only way to under
and italy? >> austerity, yes. the definition of how much. but there's no way you can deal with that problem without a substantial degree of austerity in cases where they have excesses and bubbles and various parts of the economy and deficiencies. you can't sustainably bail them out without basically quid pro quo. on the other hand, let me say you can expect them to maintain austerity and less they're going to get -- that there will be some action. or within a definite period. and this is where kind of the rubber meets the road. everybody i think understands that, let's not call austerity, but you need very discipline policy by the borrower. unity willingness to lend on a part of the creditors. accreditors don't quite trust the borrower's. the borrowers don't quite trust the creditors that they will provide the money. so they don't do this on a grand scale. they do it, comes to kind of a, they differ too much. say, we'll go in for another three months. then a few months later they come to another block in the road, although more discipline, a little more money. the central bank is, european
in italy, at vatican city, the pope talked about this as well, paying special honor that in his homily in the masses at the vatican expressing his sadness and regret. when you look at a situation like this, we're trying to find answers and we don't have answers. police are trying to put everything together but there were heroic teachers who acted so bravely to save the lives of their students. so many of them coming their rescue. >> victoria soto probably one of of the best stories to emerge out of the horror there at sand hook. she was 27 years old, a dedicated young teacher, a beautiful young gwhat she appark all of the students and -- these details are still emerging. from what it appears she told her students to go in cubbies or cabinets and went the shooter approached her, she told the shooter her students were gone to the gym or library and paid for it with her life but protected the entire class. >> even people who don't know her heard the story of how her first graders were able to survive so at a vigil, people were talking about her. >> i didn't know her at all, but i'm a mom
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)